We are seeing the effects of climate change all around us and we all know we need to do our bit. New evidence shows that climate change is affecting the behaviour of our migratory birds. Birds are arriving more than 20 days earlier than they did in the 1960’s, according to the state of the UK’s birds 2017 report. One example is the swallow. Swallows are now arriving 15 days earlier than they did 50 years ago. If climate change continues we needs to predict the future effects on birds and other wildlife.

This may not seem like a massive issue to many, but the report warns that there will be winners and losers, with some opportunities for some birds but higher extinction risks for others. For example. the night heron are now breeding in the UK, whereas the snow bunting are declining. In addition, these changes in behaviour mean that there could be a discrepancy between the time that chicks need to be fed and the food that’s available, meaning they may be less successful in their breeding.

Dr Stuart Newson of the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) said thousands of volunteers have submitted observations over many decades to show how birds have responded to climate change. He urges that “ongoing monitoring is essential if we are to track the future effects of a changing climate on our birds.”

Collatte Hall, from Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT), has said “We also need to look beyond the UK and make sure that the protected site network continues to cover the right places throughout Europe and that they’re monitored elsewhere as thoroughly as they are in the UK.”

If you would like to know how your business or home can help reduce the effects of climate change by installing renewable energy solutions then talk to us at RenEnergy. After all, we only have one planet and we all need to do what we can to save it.

 

With thanks to the BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42225917

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